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All CTC Meetings

15th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in collaboration with the Rat Genomics Community June 13 to 17, 2017 Memphis, TN USA.
13th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Berlin, Germany (May 19-22, 2014)
12th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Madison, Wisconsin, USA (May 29-31, 2013)
11th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Paris, France (June 12-15, 2012)
10th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Washington, DC USA (June 22-26, 2011)
9th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Chicago, IL USA (May 7-10, 2010)
8th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Manchester, UK (May 2 - 5, 2009)
7th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Montreal Canada (May 31 - June 3, 2008)
6th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Braunschweig, Germany (May 26-29, 2007)
May 6-10, 2006 5th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium
June 26-29, 2005 4th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium
July 6-9, 2004 Complex Trait Consortium 2004 (Bar Harbor, ME)
July 1-3, 2003 (2nd Annual CTC Meeting Oxford)
November 17, 2002 (CTC Satellite Meeting of the IMGC San Antonio, TX)
May 15-17, 2002 (1st Annual CTC Meeting Memphis, TN)


15th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in collaboration with the Rat Genomics Community June 13 to 17, 2017 Memphis, TN USA.

13th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Berlin, Germany (May 19-22, 2014)


12th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Madison, Wisconsin, USA (May 29-31, 2013)


11th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Paris, France 2012 (June 12-15, 2012)

  • 11th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Paris, France (June 12-15, 2012)
  • Organizer: Xavier Montagutelli. Institut Pasteur Paris, France


10th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Washington, DC USA (June 22-26, 2011)

  • Hosted by the GSA Genetics Society of America


9th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Chicago, IL USA (May 7-10, 2010)



8th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Community in Manchester, UK (May 2 - 5, 2009)



7th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Montreal Canada (May 31 - June 3, 2008)

  • 7th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Montreal Canada (May 31 - June 3, 2008)


May 26-29, 2007 6th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Braunschweig, Germany

  • 6th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium in Braunschweig, Germany (May 26-29, 2007)


May 6-10, 2006 5th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium

  • 5th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium, May 6-10, 2006. Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    The CTC (http://www.complextrait.org) is an international group of scientists (geneticists, molecular biologists, bioinformaticists, statisticians, etc.) working to identify networks of genes and allelic variants that modulate complex phenotypes in diverse environments. Along with the major large-scale genomic sequencing projects, QTL mapping and quantitative genetics have undergone a major revolution in the last decade. Progress in the next decade promises to be even more rapid and the prospects for exploring and investigating the complex interactions between gene variants, disease, and the environment will be significantly improved. Essentially all human diseases are complex since their range of prevalence, severity and outcome is determined by the interaction of many genes and environmental factors.

    Keynotes: David A. Schwartz, director of National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and Jean-Louis Guenet, Institute Pasteur.
    Goal: To bring together investigators interested in the use of mouse and other model organisms for the analysis of complex traits and diseases in human populations.
    Themes: (1) The integration and use of new sequence data being produced by NIEHS and Perlegen for 15 diverse mouse strains; (2) The Collaborative Cross and other genetic reference populations that are now being used in mammalian systems genetics.
    Logistics: Registration, travel and hotel information will be post soon on the CTC web site: http://www.complextrait.org

    Chapel Hill (http://www.chocvb.org) and the University (http://www.unc.edu) are near Research Triangle Park and NIEHS (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/home.htm), Durham (http://www.durham-nc.com) and Raleigh (http://www.visitraleigh.com). The area is served by the Raleigh-Durham International (RDU) Airport (http://www.rdu.com). If you have any questions regarding attending CTC-2006, please contact Jef French (french@niehs.nih.gov) or David Threadgill (dwt@med.unc.edu).



June 26-29, 2005 4th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium

  • 4th Annual Meeting of the Complex Trait Consortium, June 26-29, 2005. Groningen, the Netherlands. After 3 successful meetings in Memphis, Oxford, and Bar Harbor, the 4th CTC Meeting was held from June 26 through June 29, 2005 in the city of Groningen, the Netherlands. Groningen is a lively university city in the northern part of the Netherlands, 2 hrs. away by direct train from Amsterdam Airport. The CTC meeting was held in the Groningen University Medical Center, which is located in downtown Groningen. Online Registration Deadline (April 1,2005) has been passed. If you have any further questions regarding attending 2005 CTC Annual Meeting, please contact Gerald de Haan (g.de.haan@med.rug.nl). We hope to see you next summer! Leonid Bystrykh (Groningen University) Gerald de Haan (Groningen University) Ritsert Jansen (Groningen University) Ron Korstanje (Groningen University) Rob Williams (Univ. Tennessee, Memphis). [Download Complete Program and Abstracts] [List of Attendees] [Gallery].


July 6-9, 2004 Complex Trait Consortium 2004 (Bar Harbor, ME)

Scope/Topics
  • Quantitative genetics and QTL mapping have undergone a revolution in the last decade. Progress in the next decade promises to be even more rapid, and prospects for exploring the complex interplay between gene variants, disease, and the environment will be radically improved. The goal of the Complex Trait Consortium (CTC) conference is to bring together investigators who have common interest in the development and use of the laboratory mouse as a genetic tool for understanding human health and disease. Essentially all human diseases are complex in the sense that incidence, severity, and outcome are determined by interactions among many genes and environmental factors. Cancer, diabetes, heart and lung disease, Alzheimers, and infectious diseases all fall into this category. Our specific goals are to increase the visibility of complex traits in contemporary biomedical research through:
    -Improved awareness and appreciation for the natural variation that exists within species and is responsible for significant phenotypic variation.
    -Recognition by the broader community of scientists that the vast majority of human phenotypes have complex multigenic components whose contributions need to be understood to obtain comprehensive understanding of relevant human phenotypes.
    -Acceptance that the environment, through complex interactions with genetic variation, is a critical determinant of phenotypic diversity.
    -Development of community-wide resources that enable efficient experimental dissection of the causes of phenotypic diversity.
    Postdoctoral and graduate students are encouraged to attend. Participants are encouraged to submit an abstract for a poster session or computer demo session. Please contact Karen Grant (see link above) if you have any questions. Abstract Deadline is May 14, 2004. Please refer to the Abstract Guidelines. For more information about the 2004 Complex Trait Consortium meeting, see their web page.


July 1-3, 2003 (2nd Annual CTC Meeting Oxford)

Overview
  • The CTC is an international group of researchers working to identify the genetic variants that underly complex traits, particularly of quantitative trait loci (QTL), in model organisms such as rodents. The previous CTC meeting in Memphis, TN attracted over 100 attendees; we expect similar interest for this meeting. Particular foci of the meeting will be:

    1. to finalise ongoing discussions for the planning, production and dissemination of mouse Recombinant Inbred Lines (RIL), which are genetic resources for mapping complex traits extremely economically.
    2. to discuss the use of the draft mouse genome sequence for cloning QTL.
    3. the construction of haplotype maps for inbred mouse strains.
    The Venue of the meeting is the Gulbenkian Theatre in the St Cross Building (University Law School), 10 minutes walk from the centre of Oxford. Accommodation is available at St Catherine's College (5 mins walk from the Gulbenkian). We have reserved 70 rooms Note for travellers from Heathrow and Gatwick airports: The simplest and cheapest way to get to Oxford is by bus - see here for more details. Thanks to all those who have sent in their abstracts. Please keep them coming. If you want to present a poster or talk but don't have the title and abstract ready please email Richard Mott to let him know - we will do our best to help. Click here for Registration form (MS Word format). Or contact Gill Hewett for more details. The meeting will start at lunchtime on the 1st July and finish at lunchtime on the 3rd. See the provisional agenda . The meeting's Organising Committee: Richard Mott Jonathan Flint Robert W Williams Gill Hewett (PA to Richard Mott) We acknowledge the generous support of The Wellcome Trust in supporting this conference. For more information about the 2003 Complex Trait Consortium meeting, see their web page.


November 17, 2002 (CTC Satellite Meeting of the IMGC San Antonio, TX)



May 15-17, 2002 (1st Annual CTC Meeting Memphis, TN)

WORLD'S SCIENTISTS SNIFF TRAIL OF COMPLEX TRAITS AT U OF M

Published on May 15, 2002. By Mary Powers (The Commercial Appeal).

  • Human disease is usually caused by a messy blend of bad habits, bad luck and genes. This evening 80 to 90 scientists from around the world will gather at the University of Memphis to spend three days talking about how to speed efforts to untangle those relationships and improve human health. It is the first meeting of the International Complex Trait Consortium. Participants are interested in genes that by themselves cannot make someone sick but can leave someone more susceptible to illness. These are genes whose influence is subtle and shaded by interaction with others genes and the enviroment. Dr. Robert Williams, a University of Tennessee profesor of anatomy and neurobiology said the study of such interactions, dubbed complex traits, will be a main focus of genetics of this century. "The push has been to keep it simple. That way we know we can make progress. That just doesn't hack it anymore when you are dealing with an inherently complex problem." said Williams. he is chairing the meeting that ends Friday. It will primarily bring together scientists like Williams who use mice to study human diseases that arise not from a single genetic mistake like sickle cell or Huntington disease, but from the subtle interaction of genes and enviromental factors including diet, exercise and other enviromental factors. The meeting's goal is to identify research priorities and the tools to tackle them. Investigators have recognized for decades that most human disease arises from such complex traits. But it took the rapid advances in genetics and computer science that ocurred in the 1990s to provide scientists with the tools to act on that knowledge. The genetic code for mice and humans is now largely deciphered, although the real work of understanding the code will continue for years. It is that biochemical code, inherited from one's parents and carried in nearly all human cells, that provides the blueprint for life and the seeds of diseases. Computing advances mean statisticians are now better able to analyze the reams of data needed to identify genes linked to disease susceptibility. About 500 scientists worldwide are studying such genes. The primary tool will be new strains of mice developed specifically to study complex traits. Currently researchers purchase mice from a hanful of suppliers or develop their own. The approach is expensive and inefficient, Williams said. Meeting participants will discuss that effort. Williams said the mice would speed efforts to track the genes that contribute to human disease. That's because once a mouse gene is identified, tracking the human equivalent is easy.



Complex Trait Consortium

Last updated: October 4, 2004